Patient Services

We’ll Be There When You Need Us

MDSTAT Urgent Care locations are complete with XRAY services, laboratories and on-site pharmacies.  In addition to offering traditional urgent care services such as illness and injury care, XRAY, and lab services, we also offer preventative, wellness, and primary care services. We are truley a one-stop solution for all of your medical needs. Open 9am to 9pm, 365 days a year. No appointment is ever needed – simply walk in!
Primary Care Services

We offer:

  • COPD
  • Diabetes
  • Depression
  • Hypertension/High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Hypothyroidism

Sport's Physicals
Get your sports physical at MDSTAT Urgent Care Have a son or daughter participating in any sports during the fall or spring?  Cheer-leading, football, track and field or maybe soccer?  Chances are, their school or program will require a physical to ensure the student is healthy enough to participate.  Bring your son or daughter with their physical clearance form to your nearest MDSTAT Urgent Care.  No appointment is needed and walk-ins are welcome.  Getting a sports physical at MDSTAT Urgent care couldn’t be easier!

Urgent & General Medical Care

We offer:

  • Abscess Incision & Drainage
  • Allergic Reactions
  • Allergies
  • Asthma
  • Athlete’s Foot
  • Bronchitis
  • Burns
  • Congestion
  • Cough
  • Diaper Rash
  • Ear Infection
  • Earache
  • Eye Infection
  • Fever
  • Flu Symptoms
  • And More!

Diagnostic Medical Care
XRAYs are performed on-site and can be read immediately by our providers and partnered radiologists.

We offer:

  • Digital XRAY on-site
  • EKY
  • Lab Work
  • Pulmonary Function
  • Pulse Oximeter

Wellness & Preventative Care

We offer:

  • Employment physicals
  • Vaccinations & Immunizations
  • Medical Weight Management
  • Physical Therapy
  • School/Sport’s Physicals
  • Pulmonary Function
  • Pulse Oximeter

Vaccinations & Immunizations
Vaccinations are key to staying healthy-and preventing the spread of disease. Vaccine preventable diseases have a costly impact, resulting in doctor’s visits, hospitalizations, and premature deaths. Sick children can also cause parents to lose time from work. Myths and misinformation about vaccine safety can confuse parents who are trying to make sound decisions for their families’ health care. At MDSTAT Urgent Care, we want you to be as informed as possible. Learn more about the vaccines we provide at all our locations:      

Shingles

Meningococcal Disease (Meningitis)

Hepatitis

Influenza

Travelers

     

Shingles

What is shingles? Shingles is a painful skin rash, often with blisters. It usually appears on one side of the face or body and lasts from 2 to 4 weeks. Its main symptom is pain, which can be severe. Other symptoms can include fever, headache, chills and upset stomach. For about 1 person in 5, severe pain can continue even long after the rash clears up. Shingles is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Only someone who has had chickenpox – or, rarely, has gotten chickenpox vaccine – can get shingles. You can’t catch shingles from another person with shingles. Shingles is far more common in people 50 years of age and older. It’s also more common in people whose immune systems are weakened because of a disease such as cancer, or drugs such as steroids or chemotherapy. Shingles vaccine In clinical trials, the vaccine reduced the risk of shingles by 50%. It can also reduce pain in people who still get shingles after being vaccinated. A single dose of shingles vaccine is recommended for adults 60 years of age and older. A person should not get this vaccine if they:
  • Have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any component of shingles vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies
  • Are pregnant, or might be pregnant
  • Have a weakened immune system

Meningococcal Disease (Meningitis)

Why get vaccinated? Tetanus (Lockjaw) causes painful muscle spasms, usually all over the body. It kills about 1 out of 5 people who are infected. It can lead to tightening of the jaw muscles so the victim cannot open his mouth or swallow. Diptheria causes a thick covering in the back of the throat that can lead to breathing problems or paralysis, even death. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) causes severe coughing spells, vomiting, and disturbed sleep. Tetanus enters the body through cuts or scratches. Diptheria and Pertussis are spread from person to person. Td and Tdap vaccines Td protects against Tetanus and Diptheria. Tdap protects against all three diseases. Which vaccine, and when?
  • Tdap: for adolescents to help protect them from Pertussus
  • Tdap: for adults under 65 who expect to have close contact with a infant
  • Tdap: for healthcare workers under 65
  • Tdap: for new mothers as soon as possible after delivery
  • Td: all adults should get a booster every 10 years. Adults under 65 who have never gotten Tdap should substitute it for the next booster done
Protection After a Wound A person who gets a severe cut or burn might need a dose of Td or Tdap to prevent tetanus infection. Tdap may be used for people who have never had a dose. But Td should be used if Tdap is not available, or for: anybody who has already had a dose of Tdap, children 7 through 9 years of age, or adults 65 and older. Tdap and Td may be given at the same time as other vaccines.:gh fever, difficulty breathing, hoarseness, dizziness or swelling of the throat. < id=”Meningococcal”>Meningococcal Disease (Meningitis) Meningitis is a serious bacterial illness. Meningitis is an infection of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord, and also causes blood infections. It is fatal for 1 in 10 who contract the disease, and 11-19% who survive it have severe and permanent injuries. Who is at risk?
  • Anyone, but it’s most common in infants. Colege freshmen who live in dormitories, and teenagers 15-19 are at increased risk.
Two types of Vaccine?
  • MCV4 for patients 2 to 55
  • MPSV4 for patients over 55
Who should get the vaccine?
  • Children and adolescents 11-18
  • College freshmen living in dormitories
  • U.S. Military recruits
  • Anyone traveling to Africa or parts of the world where the disease is common
  • Anyone who may have been exposed during an outbreak
Who should not get it, or wait?
  • Anyone with a severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine
  • Anyone who is severely ill
  • Pregnant women, unless it’s clearly needed 

Hepatitis

What is Hepatitis B? It’s a serious disease that affects the liver, caused by a virus. It is spread through contact with the blood or other body fluids of an infected person. Someone can become infected by:
  • Contact with the mother’s blood during birth
  • Breaks in the skin
  • Contact with infected objects like toothbrushes or razors
  • Having unprotected sex with an infected person
  • Sharing needles while injecting drugs
  • Being stuck with a used needle
  • Who should get vaccinated?
  • Infants at birth, with completion of doses by 18 months
  • Those 18 and younger who did not get the vaccine as babies
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Those who have multiple sexual partners
  • Anyone whose job exposes them to human blood
  • Those with HIV
  • Staff/residents in institutions for the developmentally disabled
  • Travelers with destinations where Hepatitis B is common
  • People with chronic liver or kidney disease
Who should not get vaccinated?
  • Anyone with severe allergies to baker’s yeast or any other component of the vaccine
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill should wait until they recover

Influenza

Influenza (“the Flu”) is a contagious virus.
  • Spread by coughing or sneezing
  • Symptoms include fever, cough, chills, headache, fatigue and sore throat
  • Lasts for several days
  • Can severely affect infants, the elderly, pregnant women and make some conditions worse
  • Can require hospitalization and even lead to death
There are two types of flu vaccines.
  • “Live” vaccine contains a weak version of the virus. It’s sprayed into the nostrils.
  • Inactive virus (the “flu shot”) is injected.
Influenza viruses are always changing, so annual vaccination is recommended. Protection starts after two weeks and lasts about a year. The live vaccine is recommended for most healthy people between the ages of 2 and 49. Who should get a flu shot instead of the nasal spray?
  • Adults 50 and older
  • Children younger than 5 with asthma or wheezing episodes within the last year
  • Pregnant women
  • Those with long-term health problems (heart, lung, liver or kidney disease, or anemia)
  • Asthmatics
  • Diabetics
  • Those with seizure disorders
  • Anyone with a weakened immune system
  • Children or adolescents on long-term aspirin treatment
What protection will the vaccinations provide? Provides protection against A/H1N1 (pandemic) influenza and two other influenza viruses– influenza A/H3N2 and influenza B. By getting vaccinated you can protect yourself and avoid spreading influenza to others.

Travelers

In addition to the other vaccines, travelers need to be inoculated against Hepatitis A, Typhoid Fever and Yellow Fever. Typhoid Fever If you are traveling to a country where typhoid is common, you should consider being vaccinated against typhoid. We’ll be happy to discuss your vaccination options. Remember that you will need to complete your vaccination at least 1 week before you travel so that the vaccine has time to take effect. Typhoid vaccines lose effectiveness after several years; if you were vaccinated in the past, check with your doctor to see if it is time for a booster vaccination. Typhoid fever is common in most parts of the world except in industrialized regions such as the United States, Canada, western Europe, Australia, and Japan. Therefore, if you are traveling to the developing world, you should consider taking precautions. Over the past 10 years, travelers from the United States to Asia, Africa, and Latin America have been especially at risk. Yellow Fever Yellow fever can be prevented by vaccination. Travelers should also take precautions against mosquito bites when in areas with yellow fever transmission. Travelers should get vaccinated for yellow fever before visiting areas where yellow fever is found. If you continue to live or travel in yellow fever-endemic areas, you should receive a booster dose of yellow fever vaccine after 10 years. In the United States, the vaccine is given only at designated yellow fever vaccination centers. International regulations require proof of yellow fever vaccination for travel to and from certain countries. People who get vaccinated should be given an International Certificate of Vaccination. Also note that the vaccine is to be given 10 days before travel to an endemic area.

Flu Shots

Get your Flu Shot today!

Get the family vaccinated! Because the influenza virus is unpredictable, it is important to get your flu shot before the virus begins circulating.  At MDSTAT Urgent Care clinics, we offer the flu shot every day and are open 9am to 9pm, 365 days a year.  No appointment is needed.  Simply walk in and ask for your flu shot!  Preventing the flu couldn’t be easier.
  • Walk-ins welcome
  • Cash pay patients welcome
  • Most insurances accepted
  • No appointment need
  • Open 9am to 9pm, 365 days a year
Remember to “Like” our Facebook page and receive a $5 off coupon on your Flu Shot!

On-Site Pharmacy
For your convenience, all MDSTAT Urgent Care locations have a pharmacy on-site to save you time. Avoid having to wait to pick up a prescription elsewhere. Our medications are reasonably priced and can be picked up on your way out.